Sleep

Adequate and quality sleep is needed for body repair and consolidation of learning and memory, as well as psychological functioning such as reduced feelings of stress and increase of positive moods.
It is recommended that healthy adults need between 7 to 9 hours of sleep per night to function at their best.

Sleep is very important for your Brain Health. Adequate and quality sleep is needed for body repair and consolidation of learning and memory, as well as psychological functioning such as reduced feelings of stress and increase of positive moods.1 Getting the right amount of sleep also boosts your immune system, lowers your blood pressure and helps you stay at a healthy weight.
It is recommended that healthy adults need between 7 to 9 hours of sleep per night to function at their best. A chronic lack of sleep would not only negatively impact on cognitive and memory functioning but would also have many implications on health and wellbeing later in life. As you sleep your brain is hard at work processing all the memories of the day, while you sleep you blood pressure reduces, giving your heart and blood vessels a bit of rest. During deep sleep, the amount of glucose in your blood drops, reducing the likelihood of getting type 2 diabetes. Being sleep-deprived messes with the hormones in your brain -- leptin and ghrelin -- that control appetite.

The lack of sleep is big risk factor for many diseases such as cardiovascular diseases and dementia.2 Cognitively healthy adults whose sleep quality declined in middle age are more likely in late life to accumulate Alzheimer’s disease-related proteins in the brain than those whose sleep quality improved or did not change.

Sleep apnea is harmful to your brain’s health and may be the reason for interrupted sleep.3 Talk with your Doctor if you or a family member suspects you have sleep apnea.

Tips for how to improve the quality of your sleep
1. Stick to a sleep schedule. Set aside no more than eight hours for sleep.
2. Pay attention to what you eat and drink. Don't go to bed hungry or stuffed.
3. Create a restful environment. Create a room that's ideal for sleeping.
4. Limit daytime naps. up to 30 minutes and avoid doing so late in the day.
5. Include physical activity in your daily routine.
6. Manage worries. Try to resolve your worries or concerns before bedtime.
7. Increase bright light exposure during the day
8. Reduce screen time in the evening
9. Avoid caffeine within 6 hours of bedtime
10. Avoid alcohol
11. Take a relaxing bath or shower
12. Rule out a sleep disorder e.g. sleep apnea
13. Get a comfortable pillow, mattress and bed
14. Avoid liquids just before bed